log de Jose Luis Rivas

thinkwingman:

The Ultimate Weapon In Rubber Band Warfare
If somebody had asked you, yesterday, to name the top ten must-have items that your bachelor pad simply had to have, a rubber band machine gun probably wouldn’t have been on that list. Why? Because you didn’t know it existed. Now you’re going to regret laminating that wish-list, because your trusty Wingman is going to show you exactly why it needs changing.
Ingeniously designed and crafted by Alex Shpetniy & Brian Dinh, this fast-charging, easy-reload, 16-barrel, automatic machine gun is a certified fan favourite, with its Kickstarter campaign almost quadrupling its pledge aim of $5,000 with almost an entire month left to run.
Using a small electric engine, powered by just 5 AA batteries, whether your target is your arch nemesis or just a few cans lined up along a wall, the huge 672 rubber band capacity allows you to fire off 14 shots per second, at a range of up to 26 feet.
With plenty of time left to pledge – should you be unable to fight the desire to get your hands on one of your very own rubber band machine guns – the eleven different pledge options, and three stunning variations of gun design, should leave no home rubber-band-machine-gun-less this Christmas.thinkwingman:

The Ultimate Weapon In Rubber Band Warfare
If somebody had asked you, yesterday, to name the top ten must-have items that your bachelor pad simply had to have, a rubber band machine gun probably wouldn’t have been on that list. Why? Because you didn’t know it existed. Now you’re going to regret laminating that wish-list, because your trusty Wingman is going to show you exactly why it needs changing.
Ingeniously designed and crafted by Alex Shpetniy & Brian Dinh, this fast-charging, easy-reload, 16-barrel, automatic machine gun is a certified fan favourite, with its Kickstarter campaign almost quadrupling its pledge aim of $5,000 with almost an entire month left to run.
Using a small electric engine, powered by just 5 AA batteries, whether your target is your arch nemesis or just a few cans lined up along a wall, the huge 672 rubber band capacity allows you to fire off 14 shots per second, at a range of up to 26 feet.
With plenty of time left to pledge – should you be unable to fight the desire to get your hands on one of your very own rubber band machine guns – the eleven different pledge options, and three stunning variations of gun design, should leave no home rubber-band-machine-gun-less this Christmas.

thinkwingman:

The Ultimate Weapon In Rubber Band Warfare

If somebody had asked you, yesterday, to name the top ten must-have items that your bachelor pad simply had to have, a rubber band machine gun probably wouldn’t have been on that list. Why? Because you didn’t know it existed. Now you’re going to regret laminating that wish-list, because your trusty Wingman is going to show you exactly why it needs changing.

Ingeniously designed and crafted by Alex Shpetniy & Brian Dinh, this fast-charging, easy-reload, 16-barrel, automatic machine gun is a certified fan favourite, with its Kickstarter campaign almost quadrupling its pledge aim of $5,000 with almost an entire month left to run.

Using a small electric engine, powered by just 5 AA batteries, whether your target is your arch nemesis or just a few cans lined up along a wall, the huge 672 rubber band capacity allows you to fire off 14 shots per second, at a range of up to 26 feet.

With plenty of time left to pledge – should you be unable to fight the desire to get your hands on one of your very own rubber band machine guns – the eleven different pledge options, and three stunning variations of gun design, should leave no home rubber-band-machine-gun-less this Christmas.


fastcompany:

The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.
Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.
Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.
Read More> View Larger

fastcompany:

The Internet of things will soon be spitting out more data than today’s transistors can handle, but HP thinks it has a solution: The Machine.

Imagine a single device that, like the people in Honey I Shrunk/Blew Up the Kids, comes in whatever size a storyline demands. It can be the size of a server and weigh hundreds of pounds, the size of a PC, a smartphone, or a miniature sensor.

Welcome to The Machine: HP’s vision for a universal building block of the Internet of Things. The Machine is designed to operate in a world where there’s dramatically more data that’s too big to move. The device—which HP says can fulfill the role of a phone, a server, a workstation—is a big bet for HP, as the growth of the PC market continues to slow.

Read More>


generalelectric:

Admiral Grace Murray Hopper was a United States Navy rear admiral and pioneer in the field of computer science whose work paved the way for modern data processing. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language in the early 1950s. She was a firm believer that computers could become user-friendly to those who weren’t experts. To prove it, she worked on creating a common programming language that could be written in English rather than machine code. Her work led to COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages, which remains the most ubiquitous language in use by businesses to date.  View Larger

generalelectric:

Admiral Grace Murray Hopper was a United States Navy rear admiral and pioneer in the field of computer science whose work paved the way for modern data processing. She was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language in the early 1950s. She was a firm believer that computers could become user-friendly to those who weren’t experts. To prove it, she worked on creating a common programming language that could be written in English rather than machine code. Her work led to COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages, which remains the most ubiquitous language in use by businesses to date.